Nicholas Winton

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Sir Nicholas receives the Order of The Little White Lion
from Základní škola Kunžak. Prague Castle 28th October 2014

 
From left: Nick Winton, Nicky and Laurence Watson at Nicky's 105th birthday
 

Nicky and Nick enjoying a remarkable bonfire. July 2014.

Dragon of Fire

 

Nicky with his MP Theresa May

©Naturally Monni Must

 

Sir Nicholas presents the 2013 Anna Polikovskaya award to Malala Yousafzai. October 4th 2013

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International Raoul Wallenberg Foundation Ceremony June 27th 2013

Sir Nicholas with ex-Prime Minister Gordon Brown (r) and Lord Alfred Dubs (centre), one of Nicholas'  rescued “children”.

Sir Nicholas met Gordon Brown at a ceremony hosted at the Residence of the Swedish Ambassador, Her Excellency Nicola Clase.  Mr Brown was awarded the Raoul Wallenberg Centennial Medal for his services to educating young people about the Holocaust and its rescuers.

At an earlier reception at the Residence, Sir Nicholas was also awarded the Centennial Medal by the Founder of the IRWF, Baruch Tenembaum and Chairman, Eduardo Eurnekian, for his work in rescuing children from Czechoslovakia in 1939.

 

Sir Nicholas chats with Baruch Tenembaum (l) and Eduardo Eurnekian (r)

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104th Birthday Party at home. May 2013

©Naturally Monni Must

Friends and Family

©Naturally Monni Must

 

 

At the opening of the exhibition about the Winton Train at Liverpool Street Station on 21 May 2011
 
Nicky with Eva Paddock, a Winton "child" and his magnificent birthday cake!
   
Barney Reisz, son of Karel Reisz, a Winton "child", with Lady Milena Grenfell-Baines, also a Winton "child". Exhibition panels are in the background.
   
May 23rd 2011 - A visit to a Maidenhead school with Anita Grosz, daughter of Hanus, a Winton "child"
   

 

On 7 th October 2007 Sir Nicholas was invited by President Vaclav Havel as guest of honour to attend Forum 2000 in Prague , Czech Republic , a yearly conference whose theme this year was “Freedom and Responsibility”.

  Sir Nicholas Winton Speech at Forum 2000 - Monday 8 th October 2007

  Ladies and gentlemen, I know that this is not the correct way to address such an incredibly elite audience but it is the easiest way for me and at least by saying ladies and gentlemen I could be quite certain that I have left no-body out.

I think its fantastic that Vaclav Havel started this some 10 years ago and that he still keeps active in organising it. He is after all addressing perhaps the most important issue of our time and that is - how we are all going to exist for the next few hundred years, taking it that this planet of ours perhaps is beset by more and greater dangers than it ever has been.

I had a number of meetings in England and most of them spend their time in discussing the past, rehashing the past, thinking how it is that everybody should know everything about the past and they spend little time in talking about the present or the future. As one of the great philosophers once said “The only thing that one learns from the past is that one never has learnt anything from the past” and I think if one thinks about it in broad terms this is very likely true.

Everything that is bad that has happened over the ages is exemplified and continued and not enough time is given as to how we should organise our future and this is very difficult today with all the various difficulties which confront the human race; a number of which are being confronted, a number of which nobody as yet has attempted to deal with. My task is going to be more difficult because I have been asked to make it brief but anyone who is asked to speak knows its much more difficult to make a short discussion than a long one.

But what I would say is that it is to the future which Mr Havel and other people are trying to address themselves and the thing is to find out some common factor in the future under which it might be possible, if greater efforts were made, to unite everybody. I talk of course about the ethical problems, problems which are common to all religions, to all races alike and which it should be possible to create some message for the future. Certainly it is not going to be easy.

But surely there is a message which was delivered some 2000 years ago which should at least form the background of what we have to do in the future. I talk of course, it must sound rather pompous and I excuse myself for that, I'm talking just about ordinary kindness, decency, humanity, help and goodness, which people could aspire to, which I think are common to all religions and to all races and it is just as common to those religious people as it is to the agnostics. So that this is something surely under which one could somehow build a better future.

Some 2000 years ago of course this was tried, a Jewish preacher talked about ethics and how we should live and at that time the world, so statistics tell me, consisted of 300million people.

When I was born nearly 100 years ago there were 1 ¼ billion people on this planet. Today nearly 100 years later there are 4 ¼ billion and, so those people who can work out these things tell me , by the time my grandchildren have grown up, there will be 9,000 million people on this earth.

So there is a formidable task ahead and all one can say, all I can say, is that whereas the message originally never fulfilled itself, this time we have much better means of communication and one can only hope somehow or other, goodness, kindness, truth, honour will prevail and people will realise its not good enough just to say “Today I have done no harm , I've been a good person” but should have been able to say “I was given the opportunity today and I did do some good.” Thank you.